Forum Posts

drheatherbhill
Mar 18, 2021
In Equity & The Brain
It was wonderful to connect with you during our second session. We had a chance to present information to tie our understanding of neuroscience to culturally responsive teaching practice. We ended by providing space to make connections between the idea of culturally responsive teaching and the process of recognizing and leveraging students' cultural background as resource for instructional design. The Recap To begin, we analyzed educational data to consider gaps in academic achievement, not as biological or cultural deficits in students, but as record of gaps provided in opportunities to learn. Studies show that students from marginalized backgrounds are less likely to receive classroom instruction that provides opportunities for them to build their capacities as independent learners. Instead they tend to receive instruction that fosters dependent learning strategies that overwhelmingly rely on rote memorization and recall to a greater degree than, opportunities for creation, evaluation and synthesis generally associated with higher-order thinking skills (e.g. Bloom's Taxonomy). Oftentimes, it's not that students cannot engage in these types of cognitive routines, rather, they are not always provided practice fields to help them develop muscle memory in navigating these strategies, over time. We talked about the importance of "checking ourselves before we wreck SOMEONE ELSE" (Thanks for the throwback quote, Madame Tracy). Being mindful of the scripts we bring to our classrooms about the students we teach is a useful and intentional practice we can do to ensure our limiting beliefs of what children can do, do not produce or reproduce the structural inequality that already exists. When we embody a growth mindset - what others view as problems, we perceive opportunities for creativity, collaboration and innovation! We then talked about the components of an Academic Mindset to consider the many non-cognitive factors that contribute to students' self-efficacy, competence, and sense of belonging and persistence, over time. The important thing to consider, is that the brains of our kids aren't too different ours (albeit, with less wrinkles, and all the wear and tear stress that comes with adulting). We also talked about the neuroscience of information processing. Information Processing is a theory of how we learn. The theory suggests that there is an ordered and systematic process that the brain uses to screen and store information. The key insight we hope you take away from the presentation is that the brain is hard-wired to learn, and it does so through 3 distinct stages of Input, Elaboration and Application. Enabling opportunities for students to move through these stages sequentially, and to also have opportunities to rehearse them daily - together they build students intellective capacity. Input: Get the brains attention. We have 5 senses, so the many you can use, the more the brain is tempted to engage. Elaboration: Help the brain make sense or process the new information. The brain already has information stored it believes is important. Use cultural tools (e.g. music, artifacts, community members, areas of prior knowledge and relevance) as a resource to build the cognitive bridges or scaffold learning. Application: Help the brain recognize the importance of the information and store information long term. The brain is not naturally adept at "doing things just to be doing things." It is wired to screen for danger, keep the body safe, and to solve problems that arise. This means that if the opportunities are not provided for students to apply their learning in a real world context, it will be less likely that they will persist to reap the intrinsic rewards that come with completing a task. Lastly, we revisited our "Where I'm From Poems" and your ethnographic interviews to consider how we might apply or use our understanding of students rich cultural backgrounds as a resource for instructional design. We provided our "Asset Based Student Inventory for Culturally Responsive Teaching Practice" (See below) as a resource for making these connections visible. The goal with these activities is to focus our attention to the many ways in which we can learn about our students as cultural beings, and use that information to create spaces, places and learning interactions where they feel and know they belong and are safe and supported to take needed risks to progress in their learning. While this practice is key for engaging with your student families, it can also be used as a resource for community building among you and your colleagues. Although many don't always recognize this, but teachers are humans who have thoughts, feelings, and brains that are hard-wired for human connection, sense of belonging, and safety. In this way, we need each other (particularly while teaching in during these nontraditional times) as support for growth over time. Let the Where I'm From Poem and interviews be entry points for continued learning and engagement, over time! Click below to access an inventory that can be modified and used with each of your student families: Questions to Chew On How can we be more intentional in embedding opportunities for students to develop and practice skills as independent learners? How can we awaken students to the cultural knowledge, experiences and skills they bring to their classroom education as resources for teaching and learning? What kinds of assignments and/or exercises might allow you connect more often and more deeply with your student families? How can we routinize opportunities for and among teachers and staff to build community over time? Extension Activities 'Calendarize' Getting to Know Your Students. When you build relationships with your students that go beyond surface level engagement, you gain powerful information about their cultural identities and experiences that can be used to support their learning. Consider ways to routinize and normalize interactions with and among students that enable conversations that reveal deep levels of culture. Blocking out days and/or times for activities or interactions during the week to provide structure for this process. Abstract art-based activities that allow students to represent aspects of their lives or cultural artifacts for public sharing and discussion. As you did as ethnographers interviewing colleagues about their "Where I'm From Poem," you (and your students) can generate questions about their artistic decision-making as entry-point that continue familiarization with their knowledge, beliefs, values and assumptions associated with their cultural background, as well as their academic mindset. As you learn new things about your kiddos, be sure to add that information to your Asset-Based Student Inventory and use it as a resource for your instructional planning. Here are a few examples: Heart Mapping: https://www.scholastic.com/content/dam/teachers/blogs/erin-klein/migrated-files/HPLesson1_Final.pdf Design-Based Activities: Pretend you an engineer. "If you could create an invention to help kids solve any problem in the world, what kind of invention would you create?" Having children illustrate their thinking and describe their work offers insight into issues that may be important to them. They also create an opportunity to identify the kinds of beliefs, values, experiences and assumptions about the world they bring to their classroom community. Curriculum and Instruction Scan. Review the materials you are providing for curriculum and instruction. What kinds of opportunities to learn are provided to your students. Are you cultivating "dependent learners?" Are you cultivating "independent learners?" Consider adding anchor charts that make visible cognitive strategies for getting unstuck, strategies for attacking new tasks, and routines for trying new tasks without formal support i.e., jumping into tasks and engaging in the messy process or productive struggle of figuring them out. Consider ways to normalize productive struggle and independent learning in everyday instruction. To Rehash the Rehash To rehash our time together or to tune in if you weren't able to attend - Click on the link below to view the session. https://zoom.us/rec/share/qJFBvSfwd1SC3z2UYhMXih6eOuED6j8iz1b_h6FtC8m44f2zD_7_TycekoMLfzmg.Rq5xe0pg7_Qq76y9?startTime=1615922552000 SESSION FEEDBACK If you haven't already, please submit your feedback on the session: https://forms.gle/38kkVN48sq5pA5KeA Let's keep the conversations going! Thank you for your participation in and feedback on the sessions. Upcoming sessions will continue discussion about uses of neuroscience for engaging and improving culturally responsive teaching practice, and will also introduce and engage topics and issues you've informed us are important. Click the "Calendar" tab at the top of the screen to lookout for dates and times for future engagements. In the meantime, please do feel free to use the comments section to add your questions, takeaways from the session, or share out your experiences of writing and/or interviewing your colleague about their Where I'm From Poem in the space below.
Session 2 Recap content media
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drheatherbhill
Mar 11, 2021
In Equity & The Brain
As we prepare for our next session, we will be moving from understanding the basics of neuroscience to considering how we can use that information to nurture our approaches to culturally responsive teaching. At the end of the first session we spoke of the uses of ethnography for inservice teachers. Ethnography is research method taken up by social scientists seeking to understand the world from the standpoint of members in various cultural communities. Ethnographers generally engage in fieldwork where they spend a year or more in the field with local people learning about their ways of life. They use varying strategies to build relationships with community members, engage with cultural artifacts, and conduct formal and informal interviews to gain understanding from the vantage points of the individual and the collective community. For this exercise, you are being asked to take on the role of an ethnographer. The “Where I’m From Poem” will serve as your first cultural artifact. This cultural artifact will be used as an entry point for learning about your interviewee’s cultural background, understanding the scripts and schema formative in their development, and building a relationship with them over time. Step 1: Click the link below to identity your interviewee You have been assigned a colleague to interview. When you click on the link you will see a table with 2 columns. Find your name in column 1 to find out who you will interview. Then reach out to get a copy of your colleague's poem and to schedule a time for your interview. Please note: the person you interview will be different from the person who interviews you. This is designed to ensure the time you spent during the interview is wholly devoted to learning about your colleague. If you have not yet completed a poem or would like to revise your product, the assignment template and details are provided below: After you've received their poem and set the time for your interview, move on to step 2. Step 2: Annotate the poem The poem your colleague has composed brings together words they believe represent where they are from. As you read the poem you should be asking yourself: "Who is this person? Where are they from, really?" Your job is to try to step into the poem to see the life from their perspective. As you review their poem remember that there is information being presented in, and also hidden by the words the author has chosen to use to construct their poem. Thus, you will need to take some things at face value, and you will also need to use practices in inference and inquiry to dig below the surface. Consider the 3 Levels of Culture Consider scanning the poem for surface culture or observable and concrete elements of culture such as food, dress, music, and holidays. These elements are often sites for wading into discussion about the shallow culture or the unspoken rules around everyday social interactions and norms, such as courtesy, gender roles, attitudes towards elders, nature of family and friendship, concepts of time, personal space between people, and nonverbal and verbal communication, etc. As elements of shallow culture are uncovered, deep culture or the tacit knowledge and unconscious assumptions that guide our worldview and cosmology (view of good and bad) that guides ethics, spirituality, health, and theories of group harmony (i.e., competition or cooperation) can become more visible. Let your reading of the poem be guided by some of the following questions: Where are they from? Where is home for them? What might be a place where they feel furthest from home? Who are the people that have been formative in their development? Which people are valued in their community? Which beliefs have been formative in their development? Which thoughts and ideas are valued in their community? Which practices or procedures have been formative in their development? What have they learned to do? What have they learned to not do? How have their identities (e.g. race, class, gender, ethnicity, or region) influenced their development? Highlight, underline and/or circle words or phrases that stand out to you. These annotations will be foundation for developing your interview questions and eliciting responses from your partner. After you've annotated their poem, move on to step 3. Step 3: Generate a list of interview questions Consider the interview as an opportunity to get to know your colleague in a new way. Your goal is to learn something about your colleague that can be used to support you in being a better colleague. In this way, this is not an interview just for interview-sake, but an intentional connection to glean information that can be used to improve the working environment. Be sure your questions address the surface, shallow and deep levels of culture. Refrain from "yes" or "no" questions. Instead opt for open-ended questions that allow for richer and fuller response. Use the phrases and words in the poem as platform for surface, shallow and deep dive into cultural discussion. There is a lot to learn, know that this first interview is a first of many attempts to get to know another person. Jot down questions before the interview so that your time together can be focused, and your level of inquiry can hit all three levels of culture. Number your questions so that when you get into the interview you'll be able to list the question number as reference for the response. It's great for tracking, and ultimately making sense of your interview notes later. Below are some examples of surface, shallow and deep questions. Surface level questions: How did your family identify ethnically or racially? Where did you live - urban, suburban or rural community? What was it like? What were some of your family traditions - holidays, foods, rituals? Who were the heroes celebrated in your family and/or community? Shallow level questions: What metaphors, analogies, parables, or witty sayings do you remember hearing from your family members? What family stories are regularly told or referenced? What do they communicate about the values that were important in your family and/or community? What did your parents, neighbors, and other authority figures tell you about respect? What does it look like? Disrespect? Deep level questions: When you think about cultural values related to "doing school," communication, motivation, effort - what are some behaviors you think every student should exhibit? How did you come to believe this? What messages did you receive about why other racial or ethnic groups succeeded or not? What did you learn about intelligence? Did you believe it was genetic? After you've generated your list of questions, move on to Step 4. Step 4: Interview your Colleague Before you proceed, here a couple things to consider: Jot down notes during the interview - important ideas, quotes, people that are key in that person's life, to follow up in conversation during the interview and beyond. Respect your participants through active listening. Don't interrupt your participant. Let them have the spotlight. Remember you are there to learn. Focus your attention on listening, making connections, and asking interesting questions. The language used to describe where they are from may not reflect that centered in or valued by people where you are from. Recognize, respect and lean into those differences as rich opportunities for learning about the world, from another perspective. Even in cases where the language may be similar, press to understand how experience of places, spaces, people and ideas may be different. Ask questions. · Your job is to try to step into the poem to see the world from their perspective. Identify the rules and norms that are operative in their lives. Reserve judgment, and simply seek to understand. The interview should be a minimum of 30 minutes, and may be conducted face-to-face or online. Take your time.... and most importantly, Enjoy this opportunity! When you have completed the interview, move on to the final step. Step 5: Reflect on what you've learned about your colleague, and bring the annotated poem and your notes to next week's session. We will be using our notes as a resource for thinking about and engaging in culturally responsive teaching. This information will provide concrete foundation to leverage our understandings of neuroscience for teaching and learning. If you haven't already, be sure to click on "Calendar" at the top of the page to RSVP for Equity and the Brain - Part II to get the link to join the session. If you have questions, comments or concerns - feel free to reach out the facilitators directly (i.e., Dr. Heather Hill) via the "Members Chat" feature on the bottom right section of the screen, or to drop them in the comments section below.
Preparation for Session 2 content media
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drheatherbhill
Mar 03, 2021
In Equity & The Brain
We wrapped up Day 1 of Equity and the Brain feeling heartened by the ways in which you leaned into opportunities to talk about equity and the brain. The time spent sharing information about the brain and how it works allowed us to cultivate a shared knowledge for conversations ahead. The Recap To begin, we used a set of images to explore our thinking about equity, and to demonstrate how, even when we are well-intentioned and engaged in the work, our brains can still miss opportunities to recognize and talk about issues of race, class, and gender. We explored the image from the perspective of the illustrator and the audience to consider the objectives for the artistic choices, and the range of interpretations that could be constructed over time. This got us to consider the intentions and outcomes our own pedagogical choices, and how they might be read and taken up by our students generally, and those who are from marginalized cultural communities. We have such an important role in the lives of young people. Let's continue to make every effort to create the kinds of community that they can see and feel "at home" within. We then shared foundational knowledge about the brain and how it works - namely how our schemas, safety-threat systems and cultural scripts wire us to behave in particular ways. Although these schemas, systems and scripts are developed and can feel permanent, it was important to remember that the neuroplasticity of our brains ensures that they are always capable of being changed. The process of change; however, is necessarily uncomfortable. Our brains are wired to keep us safe. Despite the fact that our brains love to engage new things and often thrive in "productive struggle," any attempt to go outside our comfort zones will be read by our brains as "threat." Our survival, and our success is predicated by our membership in community. In this way, our colleagues are critical in helping us overcome our feelings to develop and sustain equity-based practices. Questions to Chew On How can we be more intentional in our practice of noticing issues of inequity? What strategies can we take up to be more intentional in designing classroom spaces where our kids' brains sense safety and sense of belonging ? What am I reading a "threat" or "safety" in my work environment? What might I need to learn or unlearn in process of becoming a culturally responsive teacher? How do we cultivate a school community where individuals feel safe and sense of belonging, as well as "warm demanding" push, necessary for individual and collective growth Extension Activities Classroom Scan.Take a look around your classroom space. What kinds of book, posters, handouts are there? What do you see? What images are presented? Whose included? Whose not included? How might the representations in those images be taken up by students from dominant and non-dominant cultural communities? Do they encourage a sense of safety and belonging i.e. let kids' brains know it is a place where they are not at risk? Quick Jot Journal. Neuroplasticity of the brain ensures that the thoughts and beliefs about ourselves and others may seem normal or permanent, but can actually be changed over time. Take some time to "think about what you're thinking about." This kind of metacognitive practice allows you to slow down your behavior, to reflect on the kinds of messages that dominate your thinking and to begin to make decisions to continue or disrupt thoughts those that don't serve you or your students. A small notebook or notes app on your phone can serve as a "Quick Jot Journal" where you can log the thoughts that emerge when you encounter particular interactions or faced with doing particular kinds of work. Use the space to briefly jot down the exact message that comes up e.g. "I am never going to get this done. I will never reach that child." Logging these kinds of statements offer you space to externalize your thoughts so that they can be processed and analyzed. TO REHASH THE REHASH To rehash our time together or to tune in if you weren't able to attend - Click on the link below to view the session. SESSION FEEDBACK If you haven't already, please submit your feedback on the session: https://forms.gle/Q5oa9BC72kA87hNu9 All constructive criticism is welcomed. Let's keep this conversation going! What did you leave the session thinking about? What questions are still weighing on your mind? We talked about the brain and its scripts and schemas in relationship to senses of threat and safety. What are you already doing in your classroom to make kids feel safe and a sense of belonging? What makes these practices feel tricky or easy to do? How has this been easy or difficulty to do in your classroom (online and/or face to face)?
Session 1 Recap content media
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drheatherbhill
Mar 02, 2021
In Equity & The Brain
Today's session will begin at 3:30pm and can be accessed using the Zoom link found in your invitation (or by clicking below) https://us04web.zoom.us/j/77822430864?pwd=YTJNVkNTTkpOTmxlUTdtUHg0Um1pUT09#success Meeting password: xNrpc7 Today the facilitators, Drs. Jamie Perryman and Heather Hill, will share information about neuroscience and culturally responsive teaching to provide a shared foundational knowledge for future conversations about equity-centered instructional design. The session will run for an hour. We will build on this conversation in our upcoming session scheduled for March 16th. During the session Sense of connection is forged when we can see and hear one another online. When you join, please turn your video on. While we will start the session with everyone muted, there will be multiple opportunities for you to share your thinking and ask questions in the whole group. Please do feel free to lean into those opportunities. The facilitators are comfortable inviting participants into those moments as well. After the session Please provide your feedback in a brief survey: https://forms.gle/V6yKgm7DVH2WozjN8 Our next session is scheduled for March 16th. You will be asked to complete an activity as preparation for our time together. That assignment will be posted by March 9th.
Equity & The Brain: Session 1 content media
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drheatherbhill
Feb 22, 2021
In Equity & The Brain
Your upcoming session will explore the neuroscience relating concepts of culture to processes of teaching and learning. To prepare for our conversations you will need to complete the following task by Wednesday, February 24th: Compose and submit a "Where I'm From" poem. Post a comment to the question presented in Step 3. Step 1. Compose a "Where I’m From Poem" You will compose a 2-stanza poem to capture where you are “from.” You may use this template to compose an original poem or you can use the template as prompt for free form poetry writing. If you choose the latter, be sure that your composition captures the topics presented in the parenthetical text included in the template. There is no one right poem. All words, ideas and ways of composing are welcomed. Happy writing! Please submit your poem in Word format in the space below. Where I'm From Poem Step 2. Submit your poem. To be sure your submission is shareable please save and upload your document in the PDF format. Click on the link to upload your work by Wednesday, February 24th. https://forms.gle/5B4qPvtMJ6L8arwf9 Step 3. Reflect on the ideas of equity and culturally responsive teaching Which words or phrases comes to mind when you hear the words: "equity" and "culturally responsive teaching?" Post your responses in the "Comments" section below.
Preparing for Session #1: Composing a Where I'm From Poem content media
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drheatherbhill
Feb 16, 2021
In Equity & The Brain
You are currently registered for "Equity and the Brain: Leveraging Neuroscience for Culturally Responsive Teaching." This 2-Day workshop will explore the neuroscience driving why and how biases are constructed in the brain, distinguish the role of culture and community in teaching and learning/human development, and apply principles of neuroscience and culturally responsive teaching to foster growth and equity-centered mindsets in ourselves and our student communities. Participation will be mediated through asynchronous and synchronous activities and interactions. Our sessions are designed to develop and nurture your knowledge and dispositions in areas of culturally responsive practice. We draw on an inquiry-based approached to professional development to create opportunities for personal and professional development. The essential questions guiding are sessions are listed below: Part I. Assessing and Shifting the Mindset of a Culturally Responsive Teacher What does it mean to be a culturally responsive teacher? If and how is this different from being a teacher? In what ways does race, class, gender and ethnicity influence perceptions of the purposes for curriculum and instruction? What is your cultural background? What cultural beliefs, experiences or cultural frame of reference do you bring to your teaching practice? How does this frame of reference influence your internal and external approach to teaching? When does cultural miscommunication emerge? How do you recognize and manage cultural dissonance? What are your triggers? What strategies do you use for situational analysis, cross-cultural communication, and self-management? How might we use principles of neuroscience to influence your academic mindset about culturally responsive teaching? Part II. Improving Classroom Environments Through Collectivism: Becoming a Community of Culturally Responsive Teachers What does it mean to have a culturally responsive classroom? If and how is it different from a classroom? If and how do the cultural identities and backgrounds of your students influence instructional design? What strategies do you use to gather cultural information about your students? What kinds of information do you collect? How does this information guide your instructional design and give them opportunities for affirmation, sense of safety, productive struggle, information processing, collaboration and/or independent learning? When does cultural miscommunication emerge between students? How do you foster cross-cultural perspective taking through curriculum and instruction? How might we use principles of neuroscience to influence your students’ academic mindset, levels of achievement and capacity for independent learning? In preparation for our first session, please click on the link below to complete and submit the Participant survey. This survey is designed to gauge your prior knowledge and experiences related to topics of neuroscience and culturally responsive teaching, and to also assess your unique personal and communicative styles and preferences. Your responses support the facilitators in differentiating interactions to optimize your learning over time. Please complete this survey by Wednesday, February 24th - Participant survey: https://forms.gle/2ofwzaUJrhZLDhjv9 NEXT STEP: Click on the link "Prepping for Session 1." In that module you will complete your first tasks to prepare for our upcoming session.
Starting our engines... Introductory Survey content media
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drheatherbhill
Feb 11, 2021
In Equity & The Brain
The formation of biases is a universal process. Biases are hard-wired in the brain. Changing our teaching approaches starts with a change in mindset. This opportunity for professional learning merges the neuroscience driving why and how biases are constructed, with pedagogical theory of culture and cultural responsiveness to provide educators practical strategies for nurturing collectivism and growth-mindedness in their professional practice, and in their classrooms with students. Meet Your Facilitators Dr. Heather Hill serves dual-roles as the Founder and CEO of Evergreen Educational Consulting and Coaching, a comprehensive support and community for educators seeking to develop, nurture and sustain an equity-centered practice; and as an Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology in the College of Education and Human Ecology at Cleveland State University. As faculty, she teaches courses in learning and development theory and the social, cultural and political foundations of education. Through curriculum that centers the scholarship of Black and Brown researchers and examines the intersectional influences of race, class and gender in education and teaching, she facilitates critical dialogue and community that develops teachers for equity-centered teaching, leading, and social action. Her approach to teaching emerges from lessons learned through research with Black girls reading and writing across urban public language arts classrooms and digital reading and writing environments. Her research highlights the historical and sociopolitical aspects of literacy education and points to possibilities for contexts of schooling to serve as spaces and places for empowerment, community building, critical consciousness raising, and academic achievement for and among Black youth generally, and Black girls in particular. Through her roles as faculty, consultant and coach she partners with caregivers, teachers and administrators to create equity-centered contexts of teaching and learning where the histories, interests, experiences and voices of marginalized communities, are centered. Bringing together learning theory, psychology, and culturally responsive teaching, she specializes in differentiated consulting and coaching to help teachers increase their sense of individual and collective efficacy, operationalize principles of equity and culturally responsive teaching in literacy education, and study their own practice to improve students' learning outcomes over time. She has worked as a literacy researcher and practitioner with the Reading Recovery, Stand Up for Shakespeare America programs at The Ohio State University, and has served as a Design Team member and Education Coach for the Ithaca City School District Anti-Marginalization Curriculum and Instruction. Dr. Hill's work has been presented across national and international conferences: the American Education Research Association, Literacy Research Association and the National Council of Teachers of English; and has been published in peer-reviewed journals like Theory and Practice, Journal of Community Engagement and Service Learning. Dr. Jamie Perryman is the Founder and CEO of The Perryman Collective, a US-based wellness coaching firm. She specializes in helping high achieving professional women re-train their brains and optimize their physical and mental health status by helping them shift their mindset and develop healthy habits aimed at destroying limiting beliefs and negative internal dialogue. She uses evidence-based techniques, proven personal development practices, and social support networking to help people transform their minds and by extension, their lives. For years, she has been helping people improve their physical and mental wellbeing through her career as a neuroscientist and public health professional in various roles that addressed health and economic disparities within marginalized groups. She has honed her expertise in the academic, medical school, and non-profits arenas. She has worked with The Child Health and Evaluation Research Unit (CHEAR), The Prevention Research Center, and the Medical School Pediatrics Division at The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in a research capacity and has partnered with several non-profits across Michigan and Ohio aimed at improving the quality of life for children, young adults and families. Before launching The Perryman Collective, Dr. Perryman was a research program manager at an elite university and committed to addressing health disparities in all forms. She has worked in the public and private sector to improve the health self-efficacy of various diverse groups throughout her time in the workforce. The establishment of a coaching firm is simply an extension of her previous professional goals into the private sector. In addition to serving in her traditional professional capacity, she is also a strong mental health advocate and speaks within churches, mentoring and community groups about the importance of establishing healthy emotional health hygiene habits and reducing stigma surrounding mental health illnesses and challenges in her local community. Additionally, she trains educators about the neuroscience of mindset within children to help them educate and serve their students in a greater capacity. Dr. Perryman is currently working on a neuroscience and personal development book that addresses the neuroscience of mindset and how to re-wire brains to achieve life goals.
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drheatherbhill

drheatherbhill

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